Featured Articles

J. K. Ingalls, “Reminiscences of an Octogenarian” (1897)

Featured articles

These Reminiscences, which largely refer to parties no longer dwellers of our sphere, are mainly the personal recollections of the author, who has never kept any regular diary. Where periodicals and books have been referred to, the memory has been relieved; but otherwise, it has been wholly relied upon. The motive leading to their publication, has been the request of friends, to have them put in readable form; but in addition to that, there are certain ideas I desired to put before the world in as familiar a form as possible. […]

Sidney H. Morse, “Liberty and Wealth” (1882)

equitable commerce

“Well,” he said, the smile still lingering in the corners of his mouth, “we are in one sense, my friend, a poverty-stricken people. We haven’t any institutions to speak of. All we can boast are certain outgrowths of our needs, which, for the most part, have taken care of themselves. We have, perhaps, an unwritten law, or general understanding, though no one to my knowledge has tried to state it. We all seem to know it when we meet it, and, as yet, have had no dispute about it. It may be said in a general way, however, as a matter of observation, that we are believers in liberty, in justice, in equality, in fraternity, in peace, progress, and in a state of happiness here on earth for one and all. What we mean by all this defines itself as we go along. It is a practical, working belief, we have. When we find an idea won’t work, we don’t decide against it; we let it rest; perhaps, later on, it will work all right. I don’t know as there is much more to say.” […]

Eliphalet Kimball, “Thoughts on Natural Principles” (1867)

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It is only by anarchy and violence that a great accumulation of social wrongs can be removed. Anarchy is a good word. In means, “without a head.” Violence is the healing power of Nature applied to society. The violence which would follow from the abolishment of law, would be proportion to the number and magnitude of the wrongs that needed removal. There ought always to be anarchy, but there would be no violence where there were no wrongs. […]

An Anarchist Survey: Response by Shawn P. Wilbur

An Anarchist Survey

It’s been several weeks since I proposed a new survey of anarchist opinion, in the spirit of those undertaken by anarchist in the early 20th century. A number of folks have agreed to work up answers to the initial questions and I’ll start things off by posting my own somewhat tentative responses. […]

Anarchist Beginnings: Collections

Programs and Manifestos

Vol. II — PROGRAMS & MANIFESTOS Ferdinand Monier, “Manifeste anarchiste” (1886) Joseph Lane, “An Anti-Statist Communist Manifesto” (1887) Commonweal Anarchist Group, “Why We Are Anarchists” (1894) London Anarchist Communist Alliance, “An Anarchist Manifesto” (1895)

Featured Projects

PROJECT: Vital Things

Contr'un

There is an element of anarchist theory that keeps imposing itself on my studies, often in the most unexpected times and places, which I think of — very imprecisely, I’ll admit — as a kind of vitalist tendency. By this I mean that there is a surprisingly common tendency, when attempting to speak about anarchy in its positive aspects, to make a connection to a range of ideas (life, sex, fecundity, progression, etc.) that are at once “natural” and disruptive of any very fixed, authoritative form of living or organizing social life. […]

Mutualism.info: An Index

Featured Projects

These are the posts previously hosted at mutualism.info: William Batchelder Greene, Letter to Orestes Brownson (1849) Annie Field, from “Whittier: Notes Of His Life And Of His Friendships” (1897) William Batchelder Greene, “The Right of […]