Proclamations for 1874

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EMPEROR NORTON PROJECT:

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January 3, 1874

Proclamation.

“A Happy New Year” to all true and loyal subjects of the Empire of

Norton I.


January 10, 1874

Proclamation.

For the better protection of the health of all our citizens, We, Norton I, Dei Gracia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby order and decree that a separate locality in the several cities, respectively, be appropriated by the City Councils of each city, to be termed the Chinese quarters, and the Board of Supervisors of the City and County of San Francisco forthwith set apart some separate locality for that object, thereby settling a much vexed question.

Norton I.


February 7, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, Understanding that one of the clerks in the U. S. Treasurer’s office has received instructions to hand over to the Emperor the amount due him. And whereas, we have made a demand on the U. S. Treasury for sufficient funds to enable us to proceed to the U. S. capital for the purpose of co-operating with the President for a National Convention for the framing of a new Constitution; and whereas we have not as yet had our orders complied with, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei Gratia, Emperor of the United States, and, Protector of Mexico, do hereby command the U. S. sub-Treasurer, Mr. Sherman, to forthwith comply with our demands.

Norton I.

———

The Emperor commands that the laws prohibiting the carrying of concealed weapons be strictly enforced, and see if the attempts at taking life cannot be stopped.

Norton I.

———

Considering it false economy, on account of the expense, to exclude the teaching of French and German from the public schools; and also on the score of utility it is absolutely necessary to teach the descendants of these foreign born people the language of their parents; therefore we, Norton I., Dei Gratia Emperor U. S. and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command the Board of Education to rescind their order excluding such lesson from the school instructions.

Norton I.


February 14, 1874

Proclamation.

Fearing that the grant of a patent for the imitation of silver such as mentioned in the Scientific American of the 24th day of January, 1874, may lead to endless frauds in the silver currency of the country, now, therefore we, Norton I, Dei Gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command the Commissioner of Patents to cancel, the said patent, and declare the manufacture of such a metal a penal offence.

Norton I.

Given in San Francisco, California, this 3d day of February, 1874.


February 28, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, the Railroads of these United States are looked upon as bad, both here and in Europe; and Whereas, they will so continue, unless the laws of the Empire are absolute and unchangeable; and, Whereas, the present Constitution being a failure, we warn both State and Congress against any proceedings whereby this important interest, and in fact the only interest that will have eventually the greatest importance in this country will be injured or retarded.

Norton I.

Emperor U. S. and Protector of Mexico, Sandwich Islands and Cape of Good Hope.


March 7, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, The American nation having acknowledged the citizen ship of the colored people, their children are entitled to admission in the public schools, and all the privileges of citizenship; you must either take the citizenship away and exclude, or admit them and grant them their privileges.

The Emperor desires his adherents to appoint a rendezvous and rave [sic] this Empire properly organized.

Norton I.

Emperor U. S. and Protector of Mexico.

———

Proclamation.

Whereas, we deem it necessary to send a Minister Plenipotentiary or go in person to the Court of Honolulu, Islands; now, there fore, we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor, etc., do hereby order the United States Government to place a suitable vessel at our disposal for that purpose.

Norton I.

Given in San Francisco, California, this 20th day of February, 1874.


March 14, 1874

Proclamation.

In order that the Fire Department should not be inefficient, and that the present difficulty should be promptly settled, we, Norton I., Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby declare David Scannel Chief of the San Francisco Fire Department, and ex-Chief Whitney Foreman of the Hook and Ladder Company; and command the Fire Department to forthwith obey this, our imperative decree.

Norton I.

Emperor U. S. and Protector of Mexico and the Sandwich Islands.


April 11, 1874

Proclamation.

In order to prevent fraud, no person is authorized to act for the Empire unless under the Emperor’s seal and signature: and whereas, a great many outrages and wrongs have undoubtedly been perpetrated against persons loyal to the Empire; now, therefore, this is to warn all such offenders that they will be severely punished for all future offenses. The adherents and supporters of the Empire are hereby notified to assemble at an early day and organize.

Norton I.

———

San Francisco, April 10, 1874. Instead of making a complete wreck of the financial interest of the Government by issuing $400,000,000 of currency, the present Congress are commanded to proclaim our Empire as the rightful Government, under penalty of arrest and imprisonment.

Norton I.


April 18, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, The Cotton and Bag Factory has, upon application, refused to pay the Emperor his royalty, and whereas, it is notorious that there is a personal interest belonging to him in the Factory; now therefore, we do hereby command tome agent true to the Empire to come forward and take charge of the said Factory and confiscate their interest to the Imperial Court.

Norton I.

———

It being absolutely necessary to properly organize our Empire; and whereas, we are desirous of co-operating with our friends and adherents, the better to obtain faithful and true officers; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei Gratia, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command all to rendezvous at Platt’s Hall, on Tuesday morning next, at 10 a.m.

Norton I.


April 25, 1874

Attention Military.—The Empire is disgraced by not having some suitable person to attend to and supply the Emperor with proper clothing, palace, etc.

Norton I.


May 2, 1874

Proclamation.

Understanding that Vasquez can only be captured by an order from us in person, know, therefore, all whom it may concern, that we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command that he be given up forthwith to the legalized authorities, to be dealt with according to law.

Norton I.


“Proclamation,” Oakland Daily Transcript 13 no. 32 (May 6, 1874): 3.


May 9, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, Our Insane Asylums are very much crowded and money is hard to be obtained; now, Therefore, We, Norton I, Die Gratia, Emperor, do hereby command our loyal subjects of Oakland to desist from sensationalism, as the Imperial Revenue don’t “pan out” brilliantly, and prairie chicken is scarce for lunch and dear.

Norton I.


May 16, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas we deem the present situation of affairs in Arkansas is proof of the necessity of the abolition of all State Constitutions, now, therefore, we, Norton I, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command the U. T. army to close the State House at Little Rock, Arkansas, and disperse all mobs who may assemble in the vicinity, at the point of the bayonet, if necessary.

Norton I.

———

Norton I, Emperor of tho United States and Protector of Mexico, being grieved at the insult to the British Consul at San Jose de Guatemala, as announced by telegraph, do hereby sympathize with the British Nation, and offers all in our power and assistance to demand reparation for the indignity.

Norton I.

———

So long as Controls exacts an import duty on brandies, etc., and demons a tax for tho manufacture of whiskey, no local net can prevent the sale, their license being paid. It may however be good judgment in Congress to repeal their act. The sale and manufacture of wines and beer is beneficial, and should not be interfered with.

Norton I.


May 23, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, some snobs in charge of the door refuted us admission to the graduating exercises of the Girls’ High School, held at Union Hall on on Thursday evening last (May 21st)—now, therefore, we, Norton I, Emperor of the United States, &c„ do hereby decree their immediate dismissal, and prohibit their future employment in public positions.

Norton I.


May 30, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas one-third interest of the Central Pacific Railroad Co. being held in trust for us in the name of President Leland Stanford, and whereas it is necessary, in order to give credit and prestige to our Empire, etc., that we should have absolute possession of the said interest; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Emperor, etc., do hereby command Mr. Stanford to forthwith grant us possesion and save the trouble of legal proceedings.

Norton I.


June 6, 1874

Proclamation.

Notwithstanding we approve very much of the charitable and beneficial acts in the deed of gift just announced by the press as being done by James Lick, we protest against his granting any funds or estates he may hold in trust, or may have, belonging to Norton I, without our royal seal and signature, it being time that we had entire control and possession of the interests of

Norton I,

Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico.


June 20, 1874

Proclamation.

The authorities of the City and County of San Francisco must see well to it that the laws be promptly enforced in the De Young-Napthally affairs, as otherwise those persons might be taken in charge by an infuriated populace and be seriously injured, and the Courts thereby insulted.

Norton I,

Emperor of United States and Protector of Mexico.

———

Proclamation.

All good people are hereby commanded to turn in procession and make the most of the ensuing Fourth of July. The Emperor acknowledges all the rights, etc., etc., and only holds and demands the authority to blend the Government into a better and purer Constitution, which object being accomplished, he desires the acceptance of his resignation.

Norton I.


June 27, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas it is announced that the Congress now just adjourned have voted an appropriation of $50,000 to the Emperor, in order that he may pay a visit to Washington next December in a style becoming to the rank and dignity of a ruler of a great and powerful people, and whereas we are determined to make this Nation a united, prosperous and happy one; know therefore, all traitors, and take warning, that such a state of things can only exist by their allegiance or death; and we further command the Sub Treasurer of the United States to forthwith pay over to us the above mentioned sum, or incur our royal displeasure. Tremble and obey!!!

Norton I,

Emperor of United States and Protector of Mexico.


July 11, 1874

Telegram to Queen Victoria.

The people are surprised to find announced by the news from Australasia this morning, that the bush rangers are about being permitted to leave Australasia for California, and should your majesty not forthwith prohibit such an act, there will be considerable bad feeling engendered against your majesty’s subjects residing in our dominions, and the bush rangers will not be allowed to land.

Norton I,

Emperor of United States and Protector of Mexico.


July 18, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereat, It is announced that on the bonds of the California Pacific Railroad signed Norton I., the interest had not been paid, whereas, we were not aware that such bonds were in existence, now, therefore, We, Norton I., Dei Gratia, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby demand possession of the mortgage for which the said bonds were issued.

Norton I.


July 25, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, The sanitary condition of the people of these United States and Mexico will be improved, and life saved, by a total abstinence from the use of ardent spirits, as a beverage, and except only for medical purposes; therefore, we, Norton I, Emperor of these United States and Mexico, decree as follows: That from and after twelve months from date, it shall be unlawful to manufacture, import, or sell, any ardent spirits within the limits of the United States or Mexico, except for medicinal purposes, as hereinbefore designated and allowed. This act shall not be so construed as to interfere with the use of malt liquors for the working man, and “wine for the stomach’s sake.”

Norton I.


August 1, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas the Emperor wishes to form his own opinion about the Beecher-Tilton scandal; and whereas some of our church people are too good to live and too good to let other people live; and whereas we are in favor of one church and unity; now, therefore, we, Norton I,—Dei gratia, Emperor of United States; and Protector of Mexico; do hereby command that the case he tried before me in personal, and that the documentary evidence be forwarded to us and then we will issue a suitable decree.

Norton I.


The Emperor’s proclamations were filler of the sort that the editors and compositors apparently didn’t notice when one of them was repeated two weeks in a row.


August 8, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas the Emperor wishes to form his own opinion about the Beecher-Tilton scandal; and whereas some of our church people are too good to live and too good to let other people live; and whereas we are in favor of one church and unity; now, therefore, we, Norton I,—Dei gratia, Emperor of United States; and Protector of Mexico; do hereby command that the case be tried before us in person, and that the documentary evidence be forwarded to us and then we will issue a suitable decree.

Norton I.

———

Whereas, nearly two hundred millions of treasure have already been extracted from the Comstock Lode; and whereas, the Emperor and the country, instead of being enriched by this vast amount of wealth, have become poor by means of frauds perpetrated by trustees, etc., and the money scattered everywhere; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor, etc., do hereby decree that it is unlawful for any organization to mine on the Comstock Lode hereafter without the Emperor’s license, and that all organizations shall give proper guarantees for the honest administration of their affairs.

Norton I.

San Francisco, Aug. 7, 1874.


August 15, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, we are determined, if possible, to keep the credit of California, and also her railroad bonds, good in Europe; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command Mr. Latham, of the London, Globe and San Francisco to pay the interest on the bonds of the California Pacific Railroad Company; and fail not, under penalty of the confiscation of his estate.

Norton I.


August 22, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, The Pacific Coast lost greatly in the death of Mr. Prevost of San Jose, in the cultivation of the silk interest, and whereas, we are desirous of giving every encouragement and facility to the production of the fine healthy silk -worms, so that the healthy eggs can be shipped to France and Italy. Now, therefore, We, Norton I., “Die Gratia” Emperor of the U. S. and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command the Directors of the Mechanics’ Fair and the Agricultural Society to select a suitable person in Mr. Provost’s place, and that we will then order the State to pay him.

Norton I.


August 29, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, we observe that the Indians are again getting troublesome, and that some of the chiefs are at war; and whereas, so long as the Indian agents continue to act unfairly with them, or the Indians mistrust them, war is the inevitable result; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor, &c., do hereby command that messages be sent to the rebellious chiefs, stating that the Emperor wishes.to see them in person and terminate all difficulties.

Norton I.

August 27, 1874.


September 5, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, We are informed that eighty two and one-half per cent. of the infant population of these United States are lost or destroyed before and after birth, superinduced by Ward Beecherism, Victoria Woodhulism and licentiousness in high places, whereby this Nation has become demoralized and degenerated, and now, therefore, We, Norton I, Dei Gracia Emperor U. S. and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command all such persons to desist from their evil practices, as it is our firm determination to stave off Divine vengeance even by fire and sword if necessary.

Norton I.


September 12, 1874

Proclamation.

Complaints are now made that all the skilled labor is not properly represented at the Mechanics’ Institute Fair; the Woolen Mills, Mr. Selby’s Shot Works, and many other equally great enterprises, being totally unrepresented; and whereas those parties are very blind to their own interests, in not showing how rapidly we are becoming the chief manufacturing place of the United States; now, therefore, we command all said parties referred to, to immediately display their manufactures, preparatory to making selections for the Centennial Exhibition.

Norton I.


September 19, 1874

Proclamation.

The authorities at Washington are held responsible and much to blame for their neglect to consolidate the Constitution or frame a new one, abolishing the State Constitutions; by which neglect the present Southern difficulties have been engendered.

Mene, Mene Tekel, Upharsin.

Norton I.


September 26, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, We observe in the papers notice of the sale of estates donated by Mr. James Lick; and whereas, we have more useful ways of appropriating our spare funds to inventive genius, when railroad and national credit is in better condition; now, therefore, we do hereby command the postponement of said sale until our private personal interest in any or ail of said estates have been set aside or purchased.

Norton I.

———

Proclamation.

To his Celestial Majesty, the Emperor of China, my dear brother, I address you these few lines to the same purport as I did some years ago to your predecessor, viz: to request that you will limit as far as possible the immigration of the Chinese, your Majesty’s, subjects, to this country, as I will not be able to restrain a strong feeling against them which might end in disaster to them if they be permitted to come in unlimited numbers.

Norton I.

No contract regarding Alaska legal without the Emperor’s signature.


October 10, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, the Spring Valley Water Works Company is assessed at only $800,000, when it is claimed to be worth $11,000,000, on which sum good interest is paid in the shape of dividends; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor, etc., do hereby command Mayor Otis and the city authorities to order another assessment, and prevent the City and State from being defrauded of a large amount of money.

Norton I.

———

Live and Let Live.”

Whereas, there is a secret society throughout the United States termed the “Grangers”; and whereas, all combinations against labor or capital in these troublesome times, when there is no confidence in anybody or anything, is injurious to society and tends to drive money to a more genial atmosphere, and is also; Imperio in Impecus, as against the good government of the Empire; now, therefore, we do hereby declare the society known as the Grangers dissolved, under penalty of our sovereign displeasure.

Norton I.


October 17, 1874

Proclamation.

Pro Bono Publico!

[Time, 11 a.m. Place, California! Street.]

Citizen.—”Why are the sidewalks! not kept clear, Emperor?”

Emperor.—”Why don’t you apply to the Mayor and Board of Supervisors (whom you have elected to administer the laws justly) for redress?”

Citizen.—”The fact of the matter is, Emperor, they play and humbug us every time.”

Emperor.—”Well, if your elected officials are so biased by the electors, how on earth can you expect the Emperor to rectify the evil, except a law is passed commanding all officers to have their bonds approved by the Emperor, and then he will be responsible.”

 


October 24, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, it is announced that His Majesty of the Sandwich Islands is on his way to this country, and is expected to arrive sometime during next week; know therefore, all whom it may concern, that we do hereby command the military in general to be in readiness to receive him, and that all our good subjects pay him due respect during his visit, and further, we do hereby command R. B. Woodward to prepare one of his sea-lions and poi, in the Sandwich Island style for the delectation of the palates of His Majesty and suite.

Norton I.


October 31, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, there are telegraphic dispatches addressed to Norton I, which are not delivered to him, personally; and whereas, the replies thereto, by incompetent persons, may lead to serious difficulties and complications; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor, etc., do hereby command Judge Hoffman to investigate the affair, and have the Superintendent and others implicated brought to justice.

Norton I.


November 14, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, The use of postage stamps more than once has become too general, now, therefore we, Norton I., Dei Gratia Emperor of the U. S. and Protector of Mexico, do hereby order the detectives to make diligent search, and arrest all and every person guilty of such practices of fraud upon the public treasury.

Norton I.


November 21, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, it is necessary to the honor of the American name that an end should be put to bribery and fraud; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby decree disfranchisement and loss of office to any Member of Congress and United States Senate, who shall be proven guilty of purchasing votes, or using money to obtain his office; and further, do hereby decree his estates to be confiscated to the Empire.

Norton I.

———

The Emperor Norton I protests against the sale of his interest in the Lick Estate without his authority in writing being first obtained, properly attested before the United States Courts. Otherwise, the Emperor approves of Mr. Lick’s donations, particularly those for scientific and sanitary purposes, and shall be glad at some future time to assist in that way.

Norton I.


November 28, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, the Government at Washington have demanded the interest due on the bonds from the Central Pacific Railroad Company; and whereas, we are desirous to know the best course to adopt with regard to said railroad company; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor, etc., do hereby command the directors to report to us the true state of affairs, with the names of the stockholders, to enable us to adopt such measures us may be deemed necessary for tho security of all parties.

Norton I.


December 5, 1874

Proclamation.

To King Kalakaua: With best compliments, we congratulate your Majesty on your safe arrival in this country, and we are pleased to find that you have been so far well received. Beware of friends with sinister intentions, who overdo matters for political advancement.

Norton I.

———

Complaints having been made by some of the vessels wanting cargoes that there are not sufficient dock accommodations on the Water Front we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor, Ac., do hereby decree that the city authorities provide more dock accommodations to supply the needs of the shipping, and that if funds are necessary, the bonds of the Empire of the Norton I, which are at the service of the city, if they provide for the payment of the interest.

Norton I.


December 12, 1874

Proclamation.

Understanding that large amounts of the Emperor’s revenues and rents are gambled away in stocks and wasted: and, whereas, the National credit and the credit of the country in the lavishment of funds is greatly injured thereby; Now, therefore, all whom it may concern, That all such licentious and wrong doers will have to make a strict account, as fifty cents thrown away could be applied to some useful purpose.

Norton I.


December 19, 1874

Proclamation.

Whereas, Dr. Merritt in sueing Mr. Wilcox for a bone filched from some one else, and being desirous that justice should be done to prevent further litigation, We, Norton I, Dei Gracia Emperor, do hereby command Merritt to disgorge to the rightful owner, and thereby show a good example.

Norton I.

———

Whereas, The Grand Hotel, hitherto our headquarters, is in rebellion, Now, therefore, We, Norton I, Emperor U. S. and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command the Water Companies to close down on them, and the Gas Company to give them no light so as to bring them to terms.

Norton I.


December 26, 1874

Proclamation.

The public having been very indulgent in the matter of the murders committed by women. They must now take warning that crime of that nature must be stopped at all hazards.

Norton I.

———

Compliments of the season to all.

Norton I.


Sources:

  1. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 19 (January 3, 1874): 2.
  2. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 20 (January 10, 1874): 2.
  3. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 24 (February 7, 1874): 1.
  4. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 24 (February 7, 1874): 1.
  5. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 24 (February 7, 1874): 1.
  6. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 25 (February 14, 1874): 1.
  7. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 27 (February 28, 1874): 1.
  8. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 28 (March 7, 1874): 1.
  9. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 28 (March 7, 1874): 2.
  10. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 29 (March 14, 1874): 1.
  11. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 33 (April 11, 1874): 2.
  12. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 33 (April 11, 1874): 2.
  13. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 34 (April 18, 1874): 1.
  14. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 34 (April 18, 1874): 1.
  15. “Attention Military,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 35 (April 25, 1874): 2.
  16. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 36 (May 2, 1874): 1.
  17. “Proclamation,” Oakland Daily Transcript 13 no. 32 (May 6, 1874): 3.
  18. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 39 (May 9, 1874): 1.
  19. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 38 (May 16, 1874): 1.
  20. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 38 (May 16, 1874): 1.
  21. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 38 (May 16, 1874): 1.
  22. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 39 (May 23, 1874): 1.
  23. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 40 (May 30, 1874): 1.
  24. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 41 (June 6, 1874): 1.
  25. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 43 (June 20, 1874): 1.
  26. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 43 (June 20, 1874): 2.
  27. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 44 (June 27, 1874): 1.
  28. “Telegram to Queen Victoria,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 46 (July 11, 1874): 1.
  29. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 47 (July 18, 1874): 1.
  30. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 48 (July 25, 1874): 1.
  31. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 49 (August 1, 1874): 1.
  32. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 50 (August 8, 1874): 2.
  33. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 50 (August 8, 1874): 2.
  34. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 51 (August 15, 1874): 1.
  35. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 1 (August 22, 1874): 1.
  36. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 2 (August 29, 1874): 1.
  37. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 3 (September 5, 1874): 1.
  38. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 4 (September 12, 1874): 1.
  39. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 5 (September 19, 1874): 1.
  40. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 6 (September 26, 1874): 1.
  41. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 6 (September 26, 1874): 2.
  42. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 8 (October 10, 1874): 1.
  43. “Live and Let Live,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 8 (October 10, 1874): 1.
  44. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 9 (October 17, 1874): 1.
  45. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 10 (October 24, 1874): 2.
  46. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 11 (October 31, 1874): 2.
  47. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 13 (November 14, 1874): 1.
  48. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 14 (November 21, 1874): 1.
  49. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 14 (November 21, 1874): 1.
  50. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 15 (November 28, 1874): 1.
  51. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 16 (December 5, 1874): 2.
  52. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 16 (December 5, 1874): 2.
  53. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 17 (December 12, 1874): 1.
  54. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 18 (December 19, 1874): 1.
  55. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 18 (December 19, 1874): 1.
  56. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 19 (December 26, 1874): 1.
  57. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 11 no. 19 (December 26, 1874): 1.
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About Shawn P. Wilbur 2119 Articles
Independent scholar, translator and archivist.