Proclamations for 1871

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EMPEROR NORTON PROJECT:

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January 7, 1871

Proclamation.

Being anxious to have a reliable weekly imperial organ, we, Norton I, Dei Gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby appoint the Pacific Appeal our said organ, conditionally, that they are not traitors, and stand true to our colors.

Norton I.

San Francisco, Dec. 23, 1870.


May 20, 1871

[“proclamation on the Chinese Question”]

May 27, 1871

Apology.—Last week, one of the compositors employed on this paper took; to unwarrantable liberty by adding two obnoxious words after the signature of Emperor Norton to the proclamation on the Chinese Question. We tender herewith our apology to the Emperor and to our readers, and promise nothing of the kind shall ever again occur, if it can be prevented by care and foresight.

Proclamation.

Whereas, We ordered the colored people some years beck to be permitted to ride in the street rail-road cars, but in order to prevent collision and future disturbance we hereby command the arrest of all who violate that decree.

The Indian Chiefs, Capt John Scott and Colonel Moss of Arizona, are hereby ordered to report themselves here at our headquarters forthwith.

Norton I.

San Francisco, this 26th day of May. 1871.


June 3, 1871

Proclamation.

Whereas, we are frequently annoyed by inspirations and doubts as to our credit and personal responsibility: and whereas, we are determined that no misunderstanding shall exist in the future about the same: now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei Gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command all and every person having any estate, interest, etc., in trust for us or our government to apply forthwith for proper credentials to manage said estate, or hand it over to us and thereby give as legal possession. Failing to comply with this our rightful request, then that they be arrested by the Attorney-General of the State until they comply.

Norton I

San Francisco, June 2, 1871.


July 22, 1871

Proclamation.

Whereas, The State authorities continue to attempt to waste the substance of our Empire, by selling or pretending to give a good title to public lands and private water lots without our Imperial seal and signature: and Whereas, we want the full value for all estate and lands to enable us to pay off the public and Amador war debts without further honerous taxation. Know all whom it may concern, that those titles will have to be signed by Royal Commissioners appointed by us before they are good.

Norton I.

Emperor U. S. and Protector of Mexico.

San Francisco, July 21, 1871.


August 12, 1871

Proclamations.

Having been informed that there is a combination of men, termed the Miners’ League, located at Sutter Creek, and also that they are illegally dictating the kind of laborers to be employed, and whereas, it is a violation of the laws of the State and of the Empire, now, therefore, we do hereby declare the said organization dissolved, and order the arrest of all members thereof who fail to heed this, our imperative decree, and thereby prevent our forwarding an army to annihilate them.

Whereas, we are anxious to know our friends from our foes, and our good and loyal subjects from our enemies, now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei Gratia Emperor of the U. S. and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command some Responsible Person to come forward, take our credentials, manage the Estudillo Ranch, and prevent our foes and dishonest persons from committing depredations on this portion of our estate.

Norton I.

Given at San Leandro this 27th day of July, A. D., 1871.


August 26, 1871

Proclamations.

We object to the sale of the City Hall lots by the Commissioners, unless we have first given our written authority to the side, or attached our seal and signature to the deeds. We do not object to the City having the lots, but we wish our rights respected.

Norton I.

———

Proclamations.

Whereas, We are desirous of ascertaining the exact position of the English and American nations in the difficulty now existing at Corea and in the Chinese waters; therefore, we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, command a suitable fleet belonging to both nations to proceed to the scene of difficulties and take such measures as may be necessary to protect the interests of both Nations.

Norton I.

San Francisco, Aug. 21,1871.


September 23, 1871

Proclamations.

Whereas we have received this day dispatches from New York City concerning the frauds perpetrated by Bill Tweed, Dick Connolly, Pete Sweeny, A. O’Key Hall, and others, members of the Tammany Wigwam and officers of said municipality, whose villainies have brought disgrace upon our national honor and reproach and ruin to the Empire City; and whereas it is our bounden duty to protect and preserve the good name, credit and respectability of oar Empire with foreign nations, therefore we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, [?] hereby decree and command that the bondsmen of said parties be held accountable for the return of all moneys feloniously obtained from the treasury of said city, and that the aforementioned wrong-doers and their accomplices be immediately placed under arrest and tried for committing high crimes and misdemeanors.

Norton I.

San Francisco, Sept. 21,1871.

———

Whereas there has been published in the newspapers during the past ten days accounts of a defalcation in the New York Post-office by a clerk named Norton; and whereas many persons have inquired of us as to his being a member of our royal house, now, therefore, we hereby proclaim and make known that said Norton is not one of the royal family, and that we shall not intercede in his behalf or shield him from the just Condemnation of an outraged government.

Norton I.

San Francisco, Sept 22,1811.

———

Whereas it is announced that one Hedges, lately Paymaster in the United States Army, is a defaulter in the sum of $1,250,000; and whereas the time has arrived when defalcations of every character—municipal, State or National—must be effectually checked and all persons committing the same be either guillotined or imprisoned for life with hard labor; now therefore we, Norton I, command said Hedges to be instantly arrested and tried for the enormous crime with which he stands charged.

Norton I.

San Francisco, Sept. 22,1871.


September 30, 1871

Proclamation

Whereas, there are great commotions in different quarters of the terrestrial globe arising from discussing the question, “The Purification of the Bible—Its True and False Lights,” and fears are entertained a that a war may break out at some remote point and spread all over the whole world, carrying in its winding course death, pestilence, famine, devastation and rain; and whereas such a state of affairs is to be deplored by all liberal-minded Christians, who oppose bigotry, charlatanism and humbuggery, and who follow the golden maxim of the lamented Lincoln, “With malice toward none—with charity for all;” and whereas Religion is like a beautiful garden, wherein the False Lights may be compared to the poppies, which fall to the ground, deny and are no more; the True Lights are like the Omniscilentes, which bloom in everlasting etherialism, blessing forever the Creator pad the Christian world by their Love and Truth; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command that all communities select delegates to a Bible Convention, to be held in the City of San Francisco, State of California, U. S. A., on the second day of January, 1873, for the purpose of eliminating all doubtful and disputed passages contained in the present printed edition of the Bible, and that measures be inaugurated towards the obliteration of all religious sects and the establishment of an Universal Religion.

Norton I.

San Francisco, Sept. 39,1871.


The Proclamation of Sept. 39, 1871 was published for a second time in the Pacific Appeal on October 7, 1871.

 


November 4, 1871

Proclamation.

Whereas, it is reported that funds belonging to our Empire and the private personal estate of Norton I were on deposit at the banking-house of John Sime & Co., this is to give notice to all whom it may concern, that the funds of the Empire and our private personal estate must be held sacred and inviolate, as also all charitable funds.

[SEAL.]

Norton I.


November 18, 1871

Proclamation.

Whereas, the existing Constitution or system of government of Mexico appears to be totally inadequate for the objects intended, and to insure the future tranquillity of that country, We, Norton I, Dei Oratia, Emperor of the U. S. and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command that the Mexican Government forthwith send a deputation to confer with us in person for the purpose of making such alterations as may be necessary under the circumstances, under penalty (in case of failure) of our sending an army and annexing their country to the U. S.

Norton I.

 


November 25, 1871

Proclamation.

Whereas, There is reported to be in existence at the present time a secret political organization termed “The Internationals,” which society and its objects causes grave fears and much apprehension in the public mind for the security and stability of Republican Government in these United States; and whereas we have heretofore declared all secret political societies illegal and unlawful; now therefore we, Norton Emperor of the United states and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command the police to arrest members of said society whenever and wherever found.

Norton I.


December 16, 1871

Proclamation.

Whereas, We have invented a Snow-Melting Machine, by which pure, fresh water can be obtained from the mountains during the winter season: and whereas, we observe that it is the intention of the Board of Supervisors of the City and County of Sac Francisco to increase the water supply of the city; now therefore we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor, do hereby prohibit the Honorable the Board of Supervisor from incurring any further expense therefor until the practicability of our scheme shall have been thoroughly tested, as thereby their can be supplied for an expense of about two or three millions instead of thirteen or fifteen millions as proposed.

Norton I.


Sources:

  1. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal 7 no. 22 (January 7, 1871): 1.
  2. [Proclamation on “the Chinese Question], Pacific Appeal, 7 no. 41 (May 20, 1871): . [mentioned in next issue]
  3. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 7 no. 42 (May 27, 1871): 1.
  4. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 7 no. 43 (June 3, 1871): 1.
  5. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 7 no. 50, (July 22, 1871): 1.
  6. “Proclamations,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 1 (August 12, 1871): 1.
  7. “Proclamations,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 3 (August 26, 1871): 2.
  8. “Proclamations,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 3 (August 26, 1871): 3.
  9. “Proclamations,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 7 (September 23, 1871): 1.
  10. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 8 (September 30, 1871): 1.
  11. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 9 (October 7, 1871): 3.
  12. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 13 (November 4, 1871): 2.
  13. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 15 (November 18, 1871): 6.
  14. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 16 (November 25, 1871): 1.
  15. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 19 (December 16, 1871): 2.
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About Shawn P. Wilbur 2096 Articles
Independent scholar, translator and archivist.