Proclamations for 1872

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EMPEROR NORTON PROJECT:

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January 6, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, we observe that certain newspapers are agitating the project of bridging the Bay; and whereas, we are desirous of connecting the cities of San Francisco and Oakland by such means; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor, do hereby prohibit the Ravenswood scheme being carried into effect, and order that the bridge be built from Oakland Point to Telegraph Hill, via Goat Island.

Norton I.

———

The authorities of Los Angeles are held responsible for the outrages perpetrated on the Chinese in that city recently, if every person implicated is not properly punished,

Norton I.

Dated San Francisco, January 5, A.D. 1872.


January 10, 1872

Proclamation.

To the Chinese Residents of America! Believing that a nation is sure to be cursed by disease, famine and death, which permits false gods to be worshipped; and considering that your idols are such, and that the good and pure moral teachings of Confucius are taught in your schools to your children, which are totally at variance with this mode of religious worship; and whereas a great your country and people would be eradicated by you worshipping the great Creator above in your private residences; now therefore we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command you to appoint some appropriate day to gather your wooden gods and idols, and send them to your churches in China, and let America have all the benefit of a pure worship.

Signed and sealed this 8th day of February, 1872.

Norton I.


January 13, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, It is announced that an Embassy is on the way from Japan to the United States and other countries, composed of persons holding high offices and members of the royal family; and whereas, we are anxious to encourage commercial and friendly relations between the United States and Japan; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor, do hereby command all persons to show said Embassy every attention during their sojourn here.

Also, in case the Duke Alexia comes to visit oar imperial highness in San Francisco, the military forces of the empire are ordered to receive him,with due courtesy.

Norton I.

Dated San Francisco, January 12th, a.d. 1872.


January 17, 1872

Proclamation.

Understanding that the title to the land which the new City Hall is being built vest in Joshua Norton, alias Emperor Norton, and is his own personal estate, we, therefore, command all parties interested, to obtain our deed, properly certified before competent authority, previous to the laying the foundation stone, and prevent the city from having to pay an enormous price at some future time therefor.

Norton I.


January 20, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, the completion of the Union Pacific and Central Pacific Railroads, with double tracks, is an object much desired by the people of the whole United States, and deserves every encouragement; therefore we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor, do hereby command all whom it may concern to assist the above enterprise by subsidy and otherwise, as also the scheme to secure steam communication between San Francisco and Australia.

Norton I.

Dated San Franciaco, January 19, A.D. 1871.


February 3, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, the directors of the Central Pacific Railroad are guilty of insurrection and rebellion against our personal prerogative and dignity by allowing their employees to tax us on making use of their road as an Imperial dignitary; and further, if this is not an Empire, Mr. Stanford is guilty of fraud in illegally taking possession of our interests and refusing to account to us therefor. Now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei Patria Emperii, do hereby command our personal friend, Hon. Mr. Luttrell, of Siskiyou, to forthwith bring articles of impeachment to compel him to give us our rights.

Norton I.

Emperor U. S. and Protector of Mexico.


March 2, 1872

Proclamation.

The Emperor congratulates the City of San Francisco on the laying of the Corner Stone of the new City Hall, and hopes that the nation will now take a new Departure, and lay the foundation of Honor and Justice, and thereby insure a future glory for the Bay City.

Norton I.

Emperor S. S. A.


March 9, 1872

Proclamation.

Being desirous of reclaiming the Fiji Islanders from “Cannibalism,” as also to educate and civilize them, thereby saving the lives of hundreds of well disposed Missionaries whom they in their present barbarous state seek to devour: Now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei Gratia Emperor U. S. and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command, that a suitable force from both army and navy be immediately dispatched to conquer and control said Island.

Norton I.


March 16, 1872

Proclamation.

LET THE EMPEROR HAVE SKATES—OR CLOSE UP THE RINKS!

Whereas, the proscriptive treason against our person, rights and privileges, crops out occasionally, and has lately shown itself at Woodward’s Gardens, the Superintendent of the Skating Rink having refused as the use of skates, when we wish to amuse ourselves in that way; and whereas great aches from little toecorns grow, and to prevent other acts of a like disloyal nature as now spoken of, we do hereby command the arrest of the aforesaid Superintendent if he perpetrates the offence the second time.

Norton I.

Done in the city of San Francisco, this 14th day of March, 1872.


March 23, 1872

Proclamation.

The following is decreed and ordered to be carried into execution as soon as convenient:

I. That a suspension bridge be built from Oakland Point to Goat Island, and thence to Telegraph Hill; provided such bridge can be built without injury to the navigable waters of the Bay of San Francisco.

II. That the Central Pacific Railroad Company be granted franchises to lay down tracks and run cars from Telegraph Hill and along the city front to Mission Bay.

III. That all deeds of lands by the Washington Government since the establishment of our Empire are hereby declared null and void unless our Imperial signature is first obtained thereto.

Norton I.


April 6, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, the removal of our Imperial likeness from the show window in front of Bradley & Rulofson’s place of business, shows a disposition to rebel against our authority which is not wholesome to be admitted with impunity; now, therefore, we Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command the return of the picture to its place, under penalty that said Bradley & Rulofson be banished forthwith, and their elevator be given to Bush of Market street.

Norton I.


April 13, 1872

Proclamation.

San Francisco, April 11th, 1872.

My Dear Mr. Gladstone;

Norton I, Dei Gratia, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, does not desire that the Sovereignty here and that of the British Empire should come in conflict. The Emperor would rather sacrifice his personal position, or interests, than that either nation should lose thereby. Independent of which, however, and under all circumstances, he claims his private personal purse and inheritance; and any claims which may be awarded by the Alabama Arbitrators. If any amount shall be awarded against Great Britain, that then the amount be paid to the United States out of the inheritance of the George IV to him.

My funds are now controled by others, and I cannot do as l desire; but should I get proper control of my funds and estate so as to place both in proper and competent hands I will immediately pay you a personal visit by way of Washington. Joshua Norton, formerly Joshua Norton & Co., merchants, Algoa Bay, Cape of Good Hope, from which position I was deprived by royal persecution, either purification for the crown or jealousy on the part of Queen Victoria’s or any other family.

Norton I.


April 20, 1872

Proclamation.

Considering that the Opera tends to elevate and refine the public taste, and whereas Bianchi’s Opera Bouffe are reported to be likely to cave in, for want of proper support. Now, therefore we Norton I, Dei Gratia, do hereby command all our friends and adherents to do all they can to prevent the Opera from being abandoned.

Norton I.


April 27, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, It is imperative for the national welfare that the Central and Union Pacific Railroads be completed with good and solid double tracks; also, that they have strong metallic snow-sheds and snow melting apparatus wherever needed, so that snow blockades hereafter may be avoided; and it is hereby commanded that the western terminus of the Central Railroad be in San Francisco.

Norton I.


May 4, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, it is announced that a German war vessel will shortly arrive at this port from Japan; and whereas, we doubt the good intentions of Kaiser William and Prince Bismarck with regard to the sovereignty of the United States and Mexico; now therefore, we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, to prevent the possibility of strife being stirred up between the Anglo-Saxon and Latin races, do hereby prohibit the landing of the crew of the said war vessel until the Prussian Government shall first give a pledge of its good intentions, and that it has no design to injure this Government.

Norton I.

San Francisco, May 3, 1872.


May 11, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, complaints are continually of frauds being perpetrated in the Stock Exchange, by piracy of other peoples claims, and then the directors selling out their interest and retiring from the mine, leaving innocent parties to suffer; and whereas we are anxious for the good name and fame of California particularly of the CROWN POINT and other joint stock mining companies. Now therefore we Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor of United States and Protector of Mexico. Do hereby command the arrest and indictment by the Grand Jury of the directors of all fraudulent mining corporations, and that a law be enacted to make the directors of all joint stock mining corporations give bonds for the proper management thereof.

Norton I.


“Proclamation,” Oakland Daily Transcript 9 no. 39 (May 11, 1872): 3.


May 18, 1872

Proclamation.

On the seven o’clock ferry with the passengers for the overland train, a tallish, knavish-looking fellow, representing himself as Mr. Short, (short of honesty) a grain merchant of Chicago, who fraudulently got possession of the following document written in pencil:

SAN FRANCISCO, May 6, 1872

Received of Mr. Short, fifty cents, the amount with interest, to be convertable into 7 per cent bonds in 1880, or payable by the agent of our private estate, in case the Government of Norton I. does not hold firm. In testimony whereof, we have to affix our Royal Seal and Signature.

Norton I. Emperor.

Any person who will catch the fellow and make him pay something to the poor, and return our receipt, will do a service to the honor of

Norton I., Emperor.

Given at Brooklyn, on the 6th day of May, 1872.


May 25, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, Many complaints are being made to our Imperial majesty concerning the California Pacific Railroad, it remaining unrepaired since the heavy rains of last winter; and whereas said railroad is of vital importance to the State, and should be repaired without delay, together with an additional track; therefore, we, Norton I, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command all whom it may concern to have the same forthwith repaired, under penalty of forfeiting their franchise.

Norton I.

San Francisco, May 20, 1872.


June 1, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, we have been informed that funds belonging to our private estate are on deposit at the Bank of California; and whereas, We will not allow the expenditure or waste of any our private or Imperial funds without our signature in writing thereto; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Rei gratia Emperor of the United Stated and Protector of Mexico, dc hereby command that a statement be made public, showing the affairs of the bank and also our private and Imperial accounts, under penalty of dissolving the present directory and the appointment of another.

Norton I.


June 8, 1872

Proclamation.

Let the Emperor have his royal prerogatives or close up the Theatres.

Whereas, rebellions subjects take advantage of the absence of our Imperial guard, and occasionally have the audacity to refuse us admittance to the theatres; now therefore we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor, etc., do hereby command the closing of any theatre which may persist in insulting the dignity of our office by refusing us admittance.

Norton I.


June 15, 1872

Proclamation.

Believing Oakland Point to be the proper and only point of communication from this side of the Bay to San Francisco, we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command the cities of Oakland and San Francisco to make an appropriation for paying the expense of a survey to determine the practicability of a tunnel under water: and if found practicable, that said tunnel be forthwith built for a railroad communication.

Norton I.

Given at Brooklyn the 12th day of May, 1812. [Imperial seal.]


June 22, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, we are desirous that the Board of Brokers of the Stock Exchange of this city should conduct their business on an honorable and solid basis; and whereas, there is a class of individuals who frequently cause the inflation and depression of the market by false representations, thereby gouging those who are uninitiated; and whereas, there are companies allowed to put stock on the market through the connivance or tacit consent of the Board of Brokers, which possess no title or right to the land on which their mining operations are to be conducted, and some of the said companies having their mines located in the “Invisible Isles,” thousands of miles away from realization, thereby causing the circulation of a lot of spurious stock, and which will inevitably cause serious loss to a number m unsuspecting persons; now therefore we do hereby command the Board of Brokers to purge their list of stocks of all such fraudulent stock, under penalty of ordering the Chief of Police to close their rooms and the appointment of a new board.

Norton I.

San Francisco, June 21,1872.


July 6, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, we understand that Col. W. H. L. Barnes is desirous to retire from the trials and inconveniencing incident to public life, and spend the balance of his days in sylvan retreats and whereas, we are anxious to extend the sphere of woman’s usefulness, and that public honors be dispensed to merit regardless of sex; and whereas, Mrs. Emily Pitts-Stevens has lately exhibited great martial powers; therefore we, Norton I, suggest that in case Col. Barnes concludes to resign, he do so in favor of the aforesaid lady.

Norton I.

San Francisco, July 5,1872.


July 13, 1872

Proclamation.

At the ticket office of the ferry landing this morning, an elderly gentleman who had just purchased a ticket for home, bound on the overroute, complained of the following inserted on his ticket:

“This ticket is good for this trip and train only, and will not be honored for passage by the conductor of any subsequent train.”

Know all whom it may concern, that such a claim is liable to petty acts of fraud, and is hereby decreed illegal under our Empire, and may entail loss of franchise to those who fail to heed this our command.

Norton I.

Brooklyn, June 29th, 1872.


August 3, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, we have drawn on the Pacific Mail Steamship Company for $2,000, which has been dishonored; and as said corporation has a large interest belonging to us, personally, we do hereby command the arrest of the President of said Company until they shall give us possession of our interests.

 

Norton I.


August 10, 1872

Proclamation.

Understanding that one party is I spending money to bribe voters for the ensuing elections, and, also, that the opposition party are expending large amounts for the same purpose, and whereas, we believe that persons who accept offices under such auspices are totally unfit to make laws which will effectually reward merit and punish crime, and if they do, by chance, occasionally make good laws, yet they are not the proper persons to enforce them. Now, therefore, we, Norton I., Emperor of the U. 8. and Protector of Mexico, do warn the American people against continuing such corrupt parties in power, at it will end in their ruin.

Norton I.


August 17, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, it is necessary for the perfect repose of our Empire that all royal decrees be duly respected until revoked or annulled; and whereas, we issued a decree of banishment against George Francis Train some months ago, which said decree has never been rescinded; and whereas, said Train has again appeared in the City of San Francisco, an act detrimental to the prestige of our authority; now therefore, we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby decree that the United States authorities have him arrested and confined in Fort Alcatraz, if he does not leave California within ten days from this date.

Given at San Francisco, this 15th day of August, 1872.

[seal]

Norton I.


August 24, 1872

Proclamation.

Our Treaties and Commercial Relations with China.

Whereas, we are desirous of preventing any outrage and wrong against good, law-abiding Chinese, as also to prevent ruinous competition to the other laboring classes and being also desirous of protecting our commerce and treaties with the gigantic Empire of China. Now, therefore, we, Norton I., Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command that a “Standing Committee” of both Chinese and other laborers be appointed; who shall regulate the powers of labor, and endeavor to alleviate any difficulties which might arise on that subject.

Norton I.

 

Given at San Francisco, this 21st day of August, 1872.


August 31, 1872

Proclamation.

We have received the following telegram, and, as requested, decline mixing our royal person with any North Carolina quarrels.

Norton I.

Executive Mansion, 29.

Emp. Nort.:

The Emperor is advised by his friends to not interfere in the local politics of North Carolina, but confine himself strictly to Railroad switches to be under his personal supervision. Failing to take this advice, he may find himself banished to Goat Island, and suffer the chagrin and humiliation of his prototype, the famed Nap. I.

Committee of 100.


September 7, 1872

Proclamation.

Understanding that the telegram which was published in this paper last week, is a forgery and without authority from any committee whatever; know therefore all whom it may concern, that we, Norton I., Emperor of the U. S. and Protector of Mexico, do hereby decree banishment from our empire of all persons concerned in said improper conduct.

Norton I.


September 14, 1872

Proclamation.

“Emperor Norton has invented a Railroad Switch, a model of which is now being made. It consists of a novel application of a spiral or elliptic spring, operated by the weight of the passing train, by which the Switch is turned off or on as desired. Patent applied for.—Mining and Scientific Press.

The Emperor desires that there should be a thoroughly practical and mechanical Switch, and his ideas to be improved upon, so that Europe will be glad to pay money to America for the patent.

Norton I.

The Emperor’s rendezvous on Friday mornings, for the present, will be at the City Gardens.


September 21, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, we issued our decree, ordering the citizens of San Francisco and Oakland to appropriate funds for the survey of a suspension bridge from Oakland Point via Goat Island; also for a tunnel; and to ascertain which is the best project; land whereas, the said citizens have hitherto neglected to notice our said decree; and whereas, we are deter-mined our authority shall be fully respected; now, therefore, we do hereby command the arrest, by the army, of both the Boards of City Fathers, if they persist in neglecting our decrees.

Given under our royal hand and seal, at San Francisco, this 17th day of September, 1872.

Norton I.


October 12, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, We are determined that the people of the United States and Mexico, shall have a good constitutions, and by which party strife shall be obviated, as also one that the laws can be enforced and not biased by party; now we, Norton I, Dei Gratia, Emperor of United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby decree that there shall be no further elections for presidents, until the nation can have a National Convention, and frame government by which said difficulty can be properly prevented. In the meantime the laws of Norton I can be made use of.

Norton I.


October 19, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, it is currently reported that the recent diamond discoveries are on the private estates of the Emperor; know, therefore, all whom it may concern, that we, Norton I, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby prohibit and warn all and every person, whomsoever, from committing depredations on said diamond fields, and that the only way to obtain title to these lands or right to remove the diamonds therefrom, is from the Emperor or his legally constituted agents.

Norton I.


October 26, 1872

Manifesto of Norton I.

The Emperor now protests that the suicidal financial policy of the Republican Government must end in total loss of national credit, and also that, in case there is no radical change, the Empire will be under the necessity of repudiating all the national interest or private estates from getting encumbered by capitals at home and abroad.

Norton I.


November 2, 1872

Proclamation.

To the Honorable the Board of Supervisors of the City and County of San Francisco. You are hereby commanded to purchase Goldsmith Maid and Lucy, for a team for the use of the Emperor. And thereby sustain the dignity of the Empire.

Given under my hand and seal, this 30th day of October, 1871.

[seal.]

Norton I.


November 9, 1872

Proclamation.

In order that scientific agriculture may continue to progress, and have all encouragement, we, Norton I, Dei Gratia Emperor United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby appoint Hon. Horace Greeley Secretary of State of our Empire.

Given under my hand and seal, this 7th day of November, 1872.

[seal.]

Norton I.


November 16, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas. It is exceedingly probable that the credit of the Empire may be deeded to obtain funds at a lower rate of interest from capitalists, as also to assist Mexico nationally. Now, therefore, we Norton I, Dei Gratia, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico. Do hereby command the Board of Brokers, forthwith, to place the Script of Norton I on their stock list, under penalty of ordering Chief Crowley to close up , their Board, if failing to comply.

[seal.]

Norton I.

Given under our royal hand and I seal this the 14th day of November, a.d, 1872.


November 30, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas. The press have announced that a gigantic fraud has been or was about to be perpetrated in the Lent Harpeading Diamond Company. And, Whereas it is absolutely necessary to protect the honor and interest of American that all such transactions should be investigated, and the guilty partial promptly punished.

Now, therefore, we Norton I, Dei Gratia, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico.

Do hereby command the Grand Jury’s attention to said transactions and to take care that justice is done or they will have to look to the consequences to themselves.

Norton I.

Given under our royal hand and seal this, the 27th day of November 1872.


December 7, 1872

Proclamation.

The Forty-Second Congress; now in session, are hereby commanded to legalize the decrees of Norton I, thereby acknowledging the Empire, and they are hereby held responsible for any depredations committed on the private estate of the Emperor, and to look well to it, that the Imperial Receivers pan out properly.

Norton I.


December 21, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, It is our intention to endeavor to obtain some alteration in the doctrine of the Church, by which the Hebrew and Christian faith will become united; as also by which the foreign churches will become Americanized; now,

Therefore, we, Norton I, “Dei Gratia,” Emperor of the United States, and Protector of Mexico, do hereby prohibit the enforcement of the Sunday Law until our object is obtained and one Sunday established.

Norton I.

Whereas, the destruction of horses in Europe by the Franco Prussian war, and now again by the epizootic disease in North America, is a world-wide calamity in the loss of so many useful animals now,

Therefore, we, Norton I, “Die Gratia” Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby offer a suitable reward for the best mode of treatment to prevent the introduction or spreading of the disease on the Pacific Coast.

Norton I.

Whereas, the public will be dissatisfied by the longer retention in office of Superintendent Harris of the Industrial School. Now,

Therefore, we, Norton I, “Die Gratia,” Emperor, do hereby command the Board of Supervisors of the City of San Francisco to satisfy the public by discharging him and appointing his successor.

Norton I.


December 28, 1872

Proclamation.

Whereas, We issued a decree commanding that the whole of the Indian Chiefs be sent to pay in person a visit to the Emperor, and be made true and loyal to the laws of the country: and, whereas, we have received a message from two of the Chiefs, through a messenger, who had a rose in his button-hale, to come and fight for them, we believe those in arms against those who rebel, are against our said command. Now, therefore, We, Norton I, Dei Gracia Emperor of the United States, and Protector of Mexico, hereby command the arrest and imprisonment of all persons who fail to heed our said decree, and make report to us thereof.

Norton I.


Sources:

  1. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 23 (January 6, 1872): 1.
  2. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 23 (January 6, 1872): 1.
  3. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 27 (January 10, 1872): 2.
  4. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 23 (January 13, 1872): 1.
  5. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 28 (January 17, 1872): 2.
  6. “From the Emperor Norton I,” Sacramento Daily Union, 42 no. 7390 (January 20, 1872): .
  7. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 24 (January 20, 1872): 1.
  8. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 26 (February 3, 1872): 2.
  9. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 30 (March 2, 1872): 2.
  10. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 31 (March 9, 1872): 1.
  11. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 32 (March 16, 1872): 4.
  12. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 32 (March 23, 1872): 4.
  13. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 35 (April 6, 1872): 1.
  14. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 36 (April 13, 1872): 1.
  15. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 37 (April 20, 1872): 2.
  16. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 38 (April 27, 1872): 2.
  17. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 39 (May 4, 1872): 2.
  18. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 40 (May 11, 1872): 2.
  19. “Proclamation,” Oakland Daily Transcript 9 no. 39 (May 11, 1872): 3.
  20. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 41 (May 18, 1872): 2.
  21. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 42 (May 25, 1872): 1.
  22. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 43 (June 1, 1872): 1.
  23. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 44 (June 8, 1872): 1.
  24. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 45 (June 15, 1872): 1.
  25. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 46 (June 22, 1872): 2.
  26. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 48 (July 1, 1872): 3.
  27. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 49 (July 13, 1872): 1.
  28. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 50 (August 3, 1872): 1.
  29. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 8 no. 51 (August 10, 1872): 1.
  30. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 1 (August 17, 1872): 3.
  31. “Proclamation. Our Treaties and Commercial Relations with China,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 2 (August 24, 1872): 1.
  32. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 3 (August 31, 1872): 1.
  33. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 4 (September 7, 1872): 1.
  34. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 5 (September 14, 1872): 1.
  35. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 6 (September 21, 1872): 1.
  36. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 7 (October 12, 1872): 1.
  37. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 8 (October 19, 1872): 2.
  38. “Manifesto of Norton I,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 9 (October 26, 1872): 2.
  39. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 10 (November 2, 1872): 1.
  40. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 11 (November 9, 1872): 1.
  41. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 12 (November 16, 1872): 1.
  42. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 14 (November 30, 1872): 1.
  43. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 15 (December 7, 1872): 1.
  44. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 17 (December 21, 1872): 3.
  45. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 18 (December 28, 1872): 3.

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About Shawn P. Wilbur 2195 Articles
Independent scholar, translator and archivist.