Proclamations for 1873

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EMPEROR NORTON PROJECT:

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January 4, 1873

Proclamation.

Understanding that there is a lady named Miss Watson, living over at Oakland, who is being annoyed by the friends of other ladies making her play hide and seek, to the danger of her liberty and rights.

Now, therefore, we Norton I, Dei Gratia, do hereby command all and every person, to desist from such outrage and wrong, under penalty of our Sovereign displeasure.

Norton I.


January 11, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, Mr. Woodward permits parties to prohibit our entrance to the “Gardens,” whereby our Friday morning Court has been broken up; and whereas, we are desirous that our funds should be in the hands of reliable friends. New, therefore, we, Norton I., Dei gratia, Emporor, do hereby command that Mr. Woodward render up possession of all money or land he may hold of Norton I., or go to prison.

Norton I.


January 18, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, we observe that Congress is making investigations in regard to the frauds committed by different railroad corporations; first, by obtaining loans and subsidies by bribery and corruption; and second, by presenting fraudulent accounts, in order to evade the payment of the interest due on said loans to the Government. Now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby decree and order the condemnatien of the interests of all persons implicated in such transactions for the benefit of the Government.

Norton I.

San Francisco, Jan. 17, 1873.


January 25, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, the native Indian who has been parading around the streets of this city, handed me a message from the Indian Chiefs now engaged in the Modoc War; and whereas, we believe the entire difficulty may be settled at once if they can be communicated with immediately; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei Gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command Governor Booth to detail a suitable corps to escort the said Indian and other envoys to the scene of warfare, and if possible induce the Chiefs to come to San Francisco and smoke the Calumet with the Emperor.

Norton I.

———

Telegram to Europe.

Norton I presents his compliments to Emperor William of Prussia, and requests that he send to the National Assembly the Sword of France, captured at Sedan, and oblige your Imperial brother,

Norton I.


February 1, 1873

Proclamation.

Our Treaties and Commercial Relations with China.

Whereas, Unprincipled demagogues are constantly harping on the injury done to labor by the influx of the Chinese; and, Whereas, we believe that the employment of great numbers of Chinese is beneficial to labor, in giving more work and regular employment; for even if they have to sacrifice something on a day’s labor, it is made up by the increased value of their other interests and the prosperity of the manufacturers of the United States; and, Whereas, we are desirous that our Treaties and Commercial Relations with that large and influential Empire shall be properly respected, Know therefore, all whom it may concern, That the eyes of the Emperor will be upon any one who shall council any outrage or wrong on the Chinese.

Norton I.

———

Understanding that one Samuel J. Clarke has been collecting rents and illegally acting as proprietor of the Peralta grant to the San Antonio Ranch; and, whereas, this fraud has been going on against myself and the occupants without my knowledge or consent for a great number of years back; know, therefore, all whom it may concern, that we do hereby prohibit any one on the said ranch from paying him any rents or taking any title from I said Clarke, as our seal and signature most be affixed thereto, or under our authority, properly attested.

Norton I.


February 8, 1873

Proclamation.

To His Majesty King Kamehameha, VI.

My Dear Brother—I congratulate you on the actions of the Hawaiian people, by which you ascend the throne, and hope and trust that you will have a long and happy reign. I am endeavoring to obtain a purification of the Bible, by which a unity of the churches, I trust, will be brought about, and thereby a spirit of justice will be paramount instead of dissension, which will, I trust, give a brighter and a purer light. With respects and best regards to Queen Emma, I remain yours faithfully,

Norton I.,

Emperor U. S., and Protector of Mexico.

———

The Emperor is disgusted with the developments in the Schuyler Colfax affair and also at the present situation of the Boss Tweed trial, and believes the only way of true reformation is to abolish and wipe out Washington Government, and to call a National Convention to remodel the Constitution.

Norton I.


February 15, 1873

Proclamation.

The Modoc War, The Result of the Neglect of the Emperor’s Decrees:

Whereas, the present Modoc War is in consequence of our Imperial Decrees having been neglected. Now, therefore, we Norton I, Dei Gratia, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, Do hereby order a concession of hostilities until communication can be sent to Captain Jack, for him to come and make peace with the Emperor.

Norton I.

Given under our royal hand and seal, this the 10th day of February 1873.


February 22, 1873

Proclamation.

In order to prevent misunderstanding at a distance, we, Norton I, Dei Gratia, Emperor, do hereby make known to all whom it may concern, that we do not father nor acknowledge any opinion on state or church matters expressed in any newspaper article as our own, or our opinion, more especially when each can be taken as a guide for unless it shall have our seal and signature attached thereto.

Norton I.


March 1, 1873

Open Letter to Norton I.

San Francisco, Feb. 14,1873.

To His Majesty Emperor Norton I:

SIRE—I would wish to draw your Majesty’s attention to the condition of this country with regard to its material prosperity.

How is it that your Majesty has allowed your subjects to remain for the last ten or fifteen years in the Rip Van Winkle sleep? It seems, however, that some of them are beginning to open their eyes and behold other nations far ahead of them, and particularly England, when many of your Majesty’s subjects are accustomed to underrate so much and taut with signs of decrepitude and decay. If you have read the article in the Evening Post of the 12th inst., relative to American and English steamers, you will not think the comparison very flattering to your subjects.

It says that American steamers are as far behind the English as a Chinese junk is behind a Yankee clipper, and, in support of their statement that with the English new combination engine, uniting both high and low pressure, only one-half the fuel is required, and this, together with their fine models and machinery, enable them to make from 14 to 16 miles per hour; whereas the American steamers in the China trade, of which Americans boast so much, can scarcely average seven miles an hour. Hence the English steamers of the White Star Line with one-half the fuel, can double the speed of American steamers, and carry more freight. Will not your Majesty do something for this country, to make her take a stand among the nations? Even Japan is going ahead of us. Why not either purchase the right of away for a ship canal across the Isthmus, or, if the naked savages will not treat fairly with you, immediately let them feel your displeasure by bringing them under subjection to the American flag; which would be better for themselves and certainly better for us. Then, with a canal across, from the Pacific to the Atlantic, and with your safety lining for vessels to secure them from striking in case they run on or strike a shoal, and with the improved English marine machinery, we would then be in a situation to carry all the wheat of this coast in our own vessels and make four trips instead of one, and soon take the lead even of the English instead of being obliged to take a back seat, as we are now doing, sitting on the tail of progression and holloing—Whoa!!! I remain, dear Sire, a friend of Progress.

Account.

———

REPLY.

So soon as the American system, socially, and of the Government engenders good principles, instead of bad, the Americans will regain their shipping, because confidence instead of distrust will be paramount.

Norton I.

Emperor U. S. and protector of Mexico.


March 8, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, the telegraph announces that some gigantic forgeries have been made on the Bank or England, and also that a ring of Americans are accused of committing the same; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei Gratia, Emperor, do hereby command that the Americans government take such action in the matter as will convince the world that it is determined not to counteance such proceedings and thereby uphold its honor.

Norton I.


March 15, 1873

[From the Torchlight]

Proclamation.

MENE, MENE TEKEL, UPHARSIN.

Give us a Constitution which will engender good laws, and one which will enforce their proper administration, and thereby get the Americans, eventually, a good instead of a bad name.

Norton I.


March 22, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, the lynching of Tarpey near Salinas, Monterey County, on Saturday last, is a total contempt and disrespect to the majesty of the law; and whereas, we are determined to bring the nation out of all such heresies; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command the arrest and trial for murder of every one of the parties implicated in said transaction, and thereby have the laws enforced.

Norton I.

San Francisco, March 8,1872.


March 29, 1873

Proclamation.

In regard to the arrest of Mr. Bogart, the Emperor will not interfere under the present Constitution, but notifies all parties concerned that in case unwarranted power has been usurped by Mr. Robeson, that it is the duty of the President to at once to discharge the Secretary of the Navy from his seat in the Cabinet.

Norton I.

———

Father Buchard and Frank Pixley had better stop their crusade against the Chinese residing on the Pacific Coast, and heed the fate of Thomas Mooney, whom we expelled from our dominions for the same offence.

Norton I.


April 5, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, in cases of great emergency, the Emperor may be required to borrow money from Europe at a low rate of interest, to relieve any tightness in financial circles; now; therefore, We, Norton I, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command the brokers, and all others concerned, to keep the script of Norton I in good and hereby give warning to all employed in depreciating the Imperial script that they will be punished with the severest penalties of the law.

Norton I.


April 12, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, we are desirous that every safeguard should be adopted with regard to sea-going ships; and also that any culpable or criminal carelessness shall not go unpunished; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command that investigation be made of the causes which led to the loss of the steamship Atlantic, and that the captain be placed under arrest, until the result thereof shall have been proclaimed.

Norton I.


April 19, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, Cachise, and probably the whole of the native chiefs within the United States and Mexico, will be advised of the particulars with regard to the present Modoc difficulty and whereas, we are determined that justice shall be enforced with regard to our policy and treatment of the North American Indians; now, therefore we, Norton I, Dei Gratia, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command the capture, as prisoners of war, of the Modoc tribe; that they be civilized and reclaimed from barbarism, and prohibit their being killed as unnecessary, except in extreme eases.

Norton I.

Given under our royal hand this 16th day of April, 1873.


April 26, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, it is our intention to have publicly punished, before as many Indian chiefs as can be assembled together, all the Indian agents and other parties connected with frauds against the Indian tribes and the Government, in order to satisfy the Indians that in future the American people intend acting justly toward them; now therefore we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command the arrest and imprisonment of said parties until all the chiefs get together, when we intend to be present with a large force.

Norton I.

San Francisco, April 25, 1873.


May 3, 1873

Proclamation.

Understanding that Captain Jack desires to surrender to the Emperor, and being desirous of pacifying the whole of the Indian tribes within the United States and Mexico, we, Norton I, Dei gratia, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command the army to cease hostilities at present against the Modocs until we can communicate with Captain Jack, leaving only sufficient force to protect and defend the settlers in the neighborhood of the Lava Beds.

Norton I.

San Francisco, May 2, 1873.


May 10, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, we are informed that a gold currency is destroying the enterprise and retarding the commercial and manufacturing interests, now therefore, we, Norton I, Dei Gratia, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command the script of Norton I be properly legalized by both nations and that a  suitable amount of such script be circulated as legal tenders, the amount to be appropriated towards the payment of the National debt.

Norton I.

———

Whereas to prevent any further difficulty in the State of Louisiana to let those disturbers of the National peace know that their fighting will avail nothing, now therefore, we, Norton, I Dei Gratia, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby declare the two rival factions Governments dissolved and null and void, and the U. S. Army is hereby authorized to arrest and imprison all and every person who snail fail to head this our imperative decree.

Norton I.

Given under our royal hand this 9th day of May, 1873.


May 17, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, we are informed that J. G. Pirse, Captain of the Monongahola Guard, is disloyal, and on a recent occasion failed to make the customary salute; it is hereby ordered that he be discharged, and an election ordered to fill the vacancy.

Norton I.

N.B.—Proscriptive traitors to the Imperial rights take warning.


May 24, 1873

Proclamation.

Understanding that citizens of Yreka are anxious for the Emperor to pay them a personal visit, aud attend to their safety in regard to the Modocs; and whereas we are desirous also of our policy being strictly uniform with regard to the North American Indians; now, therefore we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command Colonel Jack Hayes, Major Jack Stratman, Colonel Harry Linden, Colonel W. H. L. Barnes, and Lieutenant-Colonel John Scott, to hold themselves in readiness, as we intend, as soon as practicable, to proceed to the Lava Beds with an escort of sharp-shooters.

Norton I.


May 31, 1873

Proclamation.

Our treaties with China, in order to prevent total destruction of confidence in the Government of the American people, as also in the Empire of the United Stated, we, Norton I, Dei Gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby decree the Board of Supervisors of the City and County of San Francisco dissolved, and all their acts null and void, thereby preventing illegal and improper action on the Chinese Question.

Norton I.

———

The Emperor commands his loyal subjects to pay better attention to his personal necessities and see that he has proper control of the royal revenues are duly collected, so that in emergency, like the Modoc war, he can control his own personal movements.

Norton I.


June 7, 1873

Proclamation.

Now that the Modocs are subdued, we are anxious the Nation should continue in its determination to civilize and reclaim from barbarism all the natives within its territories; and whereas there is no savage so wild or treacherous but that he can be reclaimed by kindness and if he believes you are his friend: now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command that Captain Jack, his braves and his squaws, be placed in charge of Goat Island, to guard the interests of the City of San Francisco against the attacks of foreign war vessels.

Norton I.

 

Know all whom it may concern that tho Emperor will acknowledge no claim, or script, or bonds, unless the same shall be signed and sealed by the Emperor, or by properly appointed agents.

Norton I.


“Proclamation,” Oakland Daily Transcript 11 no. 62 (June 12, 1872): 3.


June 21, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas the ravages of the cholera in the State of Tennessee continues to increase frightfully; and, whereas, we are desirous that the plague shall be obliterated promptly; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby order and decree that the whole medical fraternity of the United States, for the present, be placed under the control of the authorities of that State; and any doctor ordered from one locality to another, who shall refuse to obey their requests, shall be fined and imprisoned as the gravity of the case may warrant.

Norton I.


July 3, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, It is reported that His Majesty, the Shah of Persia, it on a visit to this country; and, whereas, we are desirous that the national dignity shall be sustained, now, therefore, We, Norton, “Dei Gratia,” Emperor, Protector of Mexico, etc., do hereby command all and every person to show him every facility and respect, thereby making his stay agreeable.

Norton I.


July 10, 1873

Proclamation.

In order to put down the foreign dissension now existing between the French and the Prussian, and to prevent the difficulty of the Fourth of July culminating into a war between them, We, Norton, “Dei Gratia,” Emperor and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command the Lafayette Guard and the San Francisco Fusiliers to have a target match at an early date, and the Company that wins to be saluted by the worst shots, and thus end the dissension, under penalty of the Company being disbanded.

Norton I.


July 19, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, Many persons are in the practice of making advances or paying paltry amounts on account of claims and royalties due us; and, whereas, these parties have of late closed down on us; now, therefore, this is to give said parties notice that such action will not pay, but will render them liable to punishment and the confiscation of their estates.

Norton I.


“Royal Presence,” Petaluma Evening Argus, 2 no. 142 (July 23, 1873): 3.


July 26, 1873

Proclamation.

WHERAS We are informed that the Democratic County Convention intend meeting at Santa Rosa tomorrow morning; and whereas, it in our intention, for the present, to dissolve the present Constitution of these United States in order to bring this nation out of its present deplorable condition;

Now, therefore, We, Emperor Norton I., Dei Gratia, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby inform the said County Convention, as also both Republican and Democratic parties, that for some time to come they must depend solely on the laws and decrees of Norton I, until a wiser and better Constitution can be agreed on.

Given at Petaluma, this 23d day of July, 1873.

Norton I.

———

City Hotel, Petaluma, July 23d, 1873.

The Directors of the N. P. Railroad had better put a more loyal Superintendent to the Emperor on their Railroad, or they will find their interests consolidated to the State.

Norton I.


August 2, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, Complaints that many persons are ruined by frauds perpetrated by the stock brokers and others connected with them, thereby putting fraudulent titles or other peoples claims on the Stock Exchange, and then again by depressing or raising the market by fraudulent representations or reports. Notice is hereby given that the Grand Jury is ordered to make diligent search or all such persons and have them brought to justice.

Norton I.


August 9, 1873

Proclamation.

It has been publicly announced that Captain Jack and his tribe surrendered to Emperor Norton, etc., Being desirous that the U. S. Army should maintain their honor, now, therefore, we, Norton, I Dei Gratia, Emperor of U. S and Protector of Mexico, do hereby prohibit any action in their case without our sanction and under our seal and signature.

Norton I.


August 16, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas we are informed that about 200 families have become for the present destitute by the fire of Portland, Oregon, the Emperor does not command, but appeals to the generosity of all the churches over the Pacific coast, to come forward and give their mite for their relief.

Norton I, Emperor.


August 23, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, The Old International Hotel and other obstructions continue to retard the progress of New Montgomery Avenue, thereby causing great damage to individuals and the city; now, therefore,we, Norton I, Dei gratia Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command the Commissioners to settle with the rightful owners of the obstructions, and have the work pushed forward rapidly.

Norton I.

The Emperor reminds the various political factions that at the ensuing election they will have to co-operate with him in getting the country out of its bad credit, and that its material interests may be greatly benefitted thereby.


August 30, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, the execution of Capt. Jack and the other Indians condemned by the Court Martial will tend to bring on a general Indian war, as also have an injurious effect on the prestige of the American Government by those not in accord with its best phrase, considering also that the Indian agents have always been on the make and grab as also of other Indian lands; now therefore, we, Dei gratia, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby prohibit the carrying out of the Court Martial that our Imperial decree in their case be enforced.

Norton I.


September 6, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, there is every now and then a street report that the Emperor has received a telegram, or that he has done so and so, and on investigation found to be without foundation or fact: Whereas, we are anxious that there should be no deception, and also that no imposter should make use of our authority; know, therefore, all whom it may concern, that no act is legal unless it has our imperial signature or with our authorized Ministry.

Norton I.


September 13, 1873

Proclamation.

The Emperor warns any foreign nation against sending any of their subjects to this country who are not loyal to the person and interests of the Imperial Government of Norton I, as they will be watched and find themselves disappointed in all their undertakings.

Norton I.


September 20, 1873

Proclamation.

Having been informed that the wreck of the steamship Costa Rica was caused by the parties in charge not seeing that the Fog Whistle was kept constantly in operation and, whereas, carelessness which causes of life cannot be too severely punished: Now, therefore, we, Dia Gratia, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby order that an investigation be made, and also that neglect of duty be a discharge and another appointed.

Norton I.

———

Whereas, we are informed that the screw which works the Clay Street Railroad is not strong enough for that purpose, and that it is, consequently, dangerous to the lives of passengers; also, that the “dummy” is a useless appendage. Now, therefore, the Directors of the company are hereby ordered to see that precautions are taken to make travel on said railroad perfectly safe by using a screw with at least twenty-four inches diameter.

Norton I.


September 27, 1873

Proclamation.

Taking into consideration the fact that frauds have been committed by the agents of the Government upon the Indians, who conspired with the settlers to deprive them of their lands without compensation, I do not consider it wise policy for the American Nation to enforce the findings of the court martial against Capt. Jack and his fellow prisoners, but that they all be pardoned and sworn into the service of the United States army.

Norton I.

———

“Open Letter” to the Emperor.

San Mateo, Sept. 25, 1873.

Honored and Respected Sire—We, your unhappy subjects, do hereby ask your gracious Majesty to give us a sign that we are in favor, by writing to us; that we may feast our eyes on your handwriting, and know it was you who had grasped the pen that wrote it.

Sebastian Gonzales,
Gomez Maret,
Francois di Conde,
Milton Perce,
Frank Phillipps,
David Lawler.

Address to J. L. Gothrin, San Mateo, Cal.

———

Reply.

Not being personally acquainted with the writers, and not having (to the best of our recollection) received any tribute money from either of them, we shall willingly accord the request asked upon the receipt of fifty cents each, by mailing each our scrip of that denomination.

Norton I.


October 4, 1873

Proclamation.

The Reporters of the Press are cautioned in making wrong impressions of our actions. In one case they report a species of black mail on the Society Island, and another that the Emperor is encouraging a filibustering expedition against the Sandwich Islands—all of which are false. We are desirious of getting the Americans a good name, and not have false representations constantly paraded before the public.

Norton I.

———

Whereas, His Grace, the Duke of Manchester, is on a friendly visit to this country, any attention or respect shown him and suite will confer a favor upon

Norton I.

———

Whereas, Considerable feeling and excitement prevails in this city regarding tho treatment of the seamen on board the ship “Sunrise,” the United States Courts and officials are hereby commanded to investigate the same, so that justice may be done.

Norton I.


October 11, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, the organizations which have combined against capital, and labor against labor are the main causes of the depreciation in value of material interest of the country, as also of the total destruction of confidence in the investment of money: Now, therefore, we, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, in order to restore confidence and bring about a proper value for estates, I do hereby command the dissolution of all such organizations, and the arrest and inprisonment of the ringleaders if they fail to obey this, our imperative decree.

Norton I.


October 18, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, the First National Bank refused to honor a small check of $100, to pay the value of a model for a Railway Switch invented by us, thereby endangering our private personal interest to a large estate; and whereas it is publicly notorious that one or two of the Directors have large amounts in trust belonging to our private personal estate. Now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dia Gratia, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby decree the confiscation to the State of all the interest of said Bank as security to the Slate for any losses we have or may sustain by reason of their said acts; and in order that this, our said imperial decree, may be a warning to those who take upon themselves to refuse as royalty, when they think it is most needed, and endangering our personal health or dignity.

Norton I.


October 25, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, the conduct of Marshal Morris is unbecoming a public officer, he is therefore relieved from his position, and it is hereby ordered that another person be appointed.

Norton I.

Emperor U. S. and Protector of Mexico.


November 1, 1873

Proclamation.

In order to arrange the controversy existing among the citizens regarding the fruit and vegetable market, and as, in our opinion, the street where it is at present located is too narrow and altogether unsuited to the wants of the City of San Francisco, now, therefore, we, Norton I. Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby decree that the block bounded by Merchant and Clay, Sansome and Battery streets, be converted into an open square, to be used as a stand for market wagons; and we further decree that the Board of Supervisors make an appraisement of the property condemned, and award such damages to the owners as may be just and proper.

Norton I.


November 8, 1873

Telegram to France.

The Emperor Norton I. congratulates President MacMahon on his sound judgment, as displayed in his address to the Assembly on the 5th, abundantly proving that the Presidential system is totally inadequate to rule a nation.

Norton I.


November 15, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, It is extremely probable that the Supreme Court of the United States will hold that no sale of overflowed lands is good, unless under our royal authority and personal seal and signature, during our reign as Emperor; and whereas, it is a dangerous precedent to establish the giving away of public lands to private corporations for nothing; now, therefore, we, Norton I, do hereby order Mayor Alvord to veto the bill granting the China Basin to Booth et al.

Norton I.


November 22, 1873

Proclamation.

Understanding that Major Alvord ordered a carriage to be in attendance for the Emperor to attend the races; and, whereas there is always a corrupt or cheating party attending our unfortunate political arrangements, who are also clamorous for their pay; and, Whereas, the said carriage was not on hand, thus disobeying the Mayor’s order; now, therefore, we do hereby confiscate the said carriage, and that it be sold, and the proceeds to be given to the Ladies Relief Society of San Francisco.

Norton I.


November 29, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas we are desirous of being correctly advised of the legal and other particulars regarding the Virginius difficulty now existing between the United States and Spain; and whereas we are desirous of effecting a just solution of the affair; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Emperor of the United States and Protector of of Mexico, do hereby appoint John Parrott, Esq., Isaac Friedlander, Esq., Judge Ogden Hoffman, Frank Pixley and General Vallejo a committee to investigate the matter and make report to us, so that we may act advisedly.

Norton I.


December 6, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, Miss Ella Wesnor has been the means of directing attention and causing the amounts of charity to be sent to the city of Shreveport and Memphis from the Pacific Coast; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Dei Gratia, Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico, do hereby command the above-mentioned cities to have a golden wreath presented to that young lady, and show gratitude for favors received.

Telegram to the East.

The President considers the President’s Message a very creditable document, excepting his silence with regard to himself therein; and that the Constitutional Amendments recommended should have embraced the consolidation of the Constitution, and also amendments to the Judiciary and Presidential systems.

Norton I.


December 20, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, we are desirous that no further time shall be lost in enforcing our national decrees, in order that this nation shall forthwith have the benefit of a good sound government, and one that will engender good principles, instead of as hitherto one which has engendered bad; now, therefore, we, Norton I, Emperor of the United and Protector of Mexico, do hereby declare void and illegal any act of this Legislature in violation thereof; and, further, we do hereby command that no necessary delay take place in the election of a United States Senator, and that the Emperor will dictate who shall have the office, if they do not elect by the 1st of January.

Norton I.

Given under our royal hand and seal this 14th of December 1873.


December 27, 1873

Proclamation.

Whereas, The times are said to be very sluggish in money matters, and whereas, we are desirous that the London and San Francisco Bank, and others loaning money, should be moderate in their charges: Now, therefore, we, Norton I, Emperor do hereby command moderate rates of interest, pending proper usury laws.

Norton I.


Sources:

  1. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 19 (January 4, 1873): 1.
  2. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 20 (January 11, 1873): 3.
  3. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 21 (January 18, 1873): 1.
  4. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 22 (January 25, 1873): 1.
  5. “Telegram to Europe,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 22 (January 25, 1873): 1.
  6. “Our Treaties and Commercial Relations with China,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 23 (February 1, 1873): 1.
  7. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 23 (February 1, 1873): 1.
  8. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 24 (February 8, 1873): 1.
  9. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 24 (February 8, 1873): 1.
  10. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 25 (February 15, 1873): 2.
  11. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 26 (February 22, 1873): 2.
  12. “Open Letter to Norton I.,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 27 (March 1, 1873): 1.
  13. “Reply,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 27 (March 1, 1873): 1.
  14. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 28 (March 8, 1873): 1.
  15. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 29 (March 15, 1873): 2.
  16. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 30 (March 22, 1873): 2.
  17. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 31 (March 29, 1873): 1.
  18. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 31 (March 29, 1873): 1.
  19. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 32 (April 5, 1873): 1.
  20. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 33 (April 12, 1873): 1.
  21. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 34 (April 19, 1873): 2.
  22. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 35 (April 26, 1873): 1.
  23. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 36 (May 3, 1873): 1.
  24. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 37 (May 10, 1873): 1.
  25. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 37 (May 10, 1873): 1.
  26. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 38 (May 17, 1873): 1.
  27. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 39 (May 24, 1873): 2.
  28. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 40 (May 31, 1873): 1.
  29. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 40 (May 31, 1873): 1.
  30. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 41 (June 7, 1873): 1.
  31. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 41 (June 7, 1873): 1.
  32. “Proclamation,” Oakland Daily Transcript 11 no. 62 (June 12, 1872): 3.
  33. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 42 (June 21, 1873): 1.
  34. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 44 (July 3, 1873): 1.
  35. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 44 (July 12, 1873): 2.
  36. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 45 (July 19, 1873): 2.
  37. “Royal Presence,” Petaluma Evening Argus, 2 no. 142 (July 23, 1873): 3.
  38. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 46 (July 26, 1873): 1.
  39. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 46 (July 26, 1873): 1.
  40. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 47 (August 2, 1873): 1.
  41. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 48 (August 9, 1873): 1.
  42. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 9 no. 49 (August 16, 1873): 1.
  43. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 1 (August 23, 1873): 1.
  44. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 2 (August 30, 1873): 1.
  45. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 2 (September 6, 1873): 1.
  46. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 3 (September 13, 1873): 2.
  47. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 4 (September 20, 1873): 2.
  48. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 4 (September 20, 1873): 2.
  49. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 5 (September 27, 1873): 1.
  50. “‘Open Letter’ to the Emperor,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 5 (September 27, 1873): 1.
  51. “Reply,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 5 (September 27, 1873): 1.
  52. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 6 (October 4, 1873): 1.
  53. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 6 (October 4, 1873): 1.
  54. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 6 (October 4, 1873): 1.
  55. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 7 (October 11, 1873): 1.
  56. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 8 (October 18, 1873): 1.
  57. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 9 (October 25, 1873): 2.
  58. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 10 (November 1, 1873): 2.
  59. “Telegram to France,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 11 (November 8, 1873): 2.
  60. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 12 (November 15, 1873): 2.
  61. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 13 (November 22, 1873): 1.
  62. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 14 (November 29, 1873): 1.
  63. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 15 (December 6, 1873): 1.
  64. “Telegram to the East,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 15 (December 6, 1873): 1.
  65. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 17 (December 20, 1873): 1.
  66. “Proclamation,” Pacific Appeal, 10 no. 18 (December 27, 1873): 1.

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About Shawn P. Wilbur 2190 Articles
Independent scholar, translator and archivist.