The Anarchist Encyclopedia — I

ICONOCLASTE

ICONOCLASTE

IDEAL

IDEAL

Idéal bourgeois ou idéal capitaliste.

L’Idéal anarchiste.

IDEALISME

IDEALISME (et matérialisme)

IDÉE

IDEE

IDEE GENERALE de la Révolution au XIXème siècle

IDENTITÉ

IDÉOLOGIE

IDIOME

IDO

Historique du mouvement Idiste.

Chez les Anarchistes.

IDOLÂTRIE

IGNORANCE

IGNORANCE

IGNORANTIN

IGNORANTISME

ILLÉGALISME

ILLÉGALISME (Le vol)

ILLÉGALISME

ILLÉGALISME

ILLÉGALISME (Son aspect, sa pratique et ses aboutissants.)

ILLÉGITIME

ILLOGIQUE

ILLUSION

IMAGINATION

IMBROGLIO

IMITATION

IMMIGRATION

IMMISCER (S’)

IMMORALITE

IMMORTALITE

IMMUNITE

IMPARTIALITE

IMPARTIALITE

IMPASSIBILITÉ

IMPERIALISME

IMPIETE

IMPONDERABLE

IMPOPULARITE

IMPORTATION

IMPOT

IMPRECATION

IMPREGNER

S’IMPREGNER

IMPRESSION

IMPRIMERIE

IMPROVISER

IMPUDENCE

IMPULSIF

IMPULSION

IMPUNITÉ

IMPUTATION

INACTION

INAMICAL

INAMOVIBILITE

INCAPACITÉ

INCARCERATION

INCARNATION

INCOHERENT

INCOMPATIBILITE

INCOMPREHENSION

INCONSCIENCE

INCONSEQUENCE


INCONSISTANCE (FR/EN)

INCONSISTENCY n. Lack of stability, of solidity. In gastronomy, the inconsistency of a dish, that of an opinion in sociology or in politics. In physics, absence of bonding of the molecules. The inconsistency of a good or of a business are factors of fragility or of powerlessness. A work lacking in depth, with an equivocal plan, [and] a weak character, insufficiently tempered, are called inconsistent. Also, a lack of development, of coordination in the ideas, marked by weakness and incapacity, and considered apart from all deceit or intentional laxity: the inconsistency, for example, of a party, of a government, of a reigning personality. Charles VII, Louis XVI and Nicholas II have been inconsistent royal types.  We can have no hope for an informed, firm, coherent activity from inconsistent individuals and with them we waste our efforts at propaganda. Inconsistency holds them or draws them back into mass and they can at best make up the vacillating element and unpredictable auxiliary of the parties. At their critical point, however, revolutions have had the balance of their success determined by these amorphous forces. And no sociology can be uninterested in the inconsistent or neglect the sudden, weighty surges and reactions of its fitful tides.


INCORRUPTIBLE

INCREDULITE


INDÉFINI (FR/EN)

INDEFINITE adj., occasionally subs. (from the Latin indefinitus) That which is not delimited, either in an absolute sense or with regard to our knowledge. Humanity appears to us capable of an indefinite development, but this progress is not necessarily conditioned par by the divine infinite. In philosophy, the indefinite designates the undetermined, not the infinite. “It is opposed to the definite, as infinite is to finite. It means that which does not have limits that our mind perceives, but which may have them in reality. The idea of the indefinite expresses a possible experience, that of the infinite conveys an idea posited a priori.” (Larousse). An idea that lacks definition is called indefinite. In logic, the term indefinite designates the proposition that is suited to the general, not to the particular. In grammar, it expresses a vague a vague idea that we do not apply to a precise object or a specific time: article article, adjective, noun, sense, subject, past. The infinitive, the participle, modes without persons, are indefinite modes. In chemistry, the indefinite combinations are those that are made in all proportions.


INDEPENDANCE

INDEX

INDIGENCE

INDIGENE

INDISCIPLINE

INDIVIDU, INDIVIDUALISME

INDIVIDUALISME

INDIVIDUALISME (Anarchisme altruiste)

INDIVIDUALISME (Anarchisme-égoïste)

INDIVIDUALISME (Anarchisme-harmonique)

INDIVIDUALISME (Anarchisme individualiste)

INDIVIDUALISME (Mon)

INDIVIDUALISME (Socialisme-individualiste)

INDIVIDUALISME (Socialisme-rationnel)

INDIVIDUALISME (ou Communisme ?)

INDIVIDUALISME (Éducation)

INDULGENCE

INDUSTRIALISME

INEGALITE

INERTIE

INFAILLIBLE

INFAMIE

INFAMANT

INFANTICIDE

INFANTICIDE

INFECTION

INFERIORITE

INFIDÈLE, INFIDÉLITÉ

INFILTRATION

INFINI

INFIRMITÉ

INFLUENCE

INFRACTION

INGENIEUX

INGERENCE

INHUMAIN, INHUMANITE

INHUMATION

INHUMER


INIMITIE (FR/EN)

ENMITY n. (From the Latin in, non; amicitia, amity) Feeling of malice, of hatred, antipathy, aversion, rancor. Great, ancient, old, profound, deep-rooted, irreconcilable, vindictive or hereditary enmity. “Enmities are very dangerous among a free people.” (Montesquieu).

Enmity is opposed to rancor, in the sense that enmity ordinarily expresses a hostility that has been declared, and rancor concealed ill will. Enmity does not exclude dignity, nobility; rancor incorporates weakness, cowardice, meanness.


INITIATION (FR/EN)

INITIATION n. (from Latin initiatio) Act of initiating or of being initiated. Ceremony by which one was initiation into knowledge of and participation in certain mysteries in ancient religions and secret societies. By extension, introduction, first knowledge: artistic initiation, literary initiation.

In antiquity the initiation was the ceremony by which a candidate was admitted into the mysteries of some cult, which gave them the right to witness and participate in the honors rendered to the divinity that was the object of worship. All the religions have had their mysteries and, consequently, their initiates. It is through initiation that the ancient clergy was recruited, and the more mysterious the esoteric meaning of a cult was, the longer and more difficult were the trials judged necessary in order to be initiated. Secrecy was always imposed on the initiates. There were several degrees in the initiation, by which one arrived at the contemplation of the holy mysteries. Christianity has also had its initiatives. In the Middle Ages, the adepts of magic were recruited through initiation, which was for them a security measure.

The associations created with a mystical aim are not the only one that have practiced initiation. It has also be practiced by the schools of philosophy, as well as societies having a political or social goal: freemasonry, for example.


INITIATIVE

INJURE


INJUSTICE (FR/EN)

INJUSTICE n. from the Latin injustitia. Lack of justice, of equity. To abhor injustice. Also said of an act of injustice: they have done a great injustice.

“There are no small reforms, no small economies, no small injustices.” (Proudbon)

“To see injustice and remain silent, is to commit the injustice ourselves.” (J.-J. Rousseau)

“An injustice done to one alone is a threat made to all.” (Boiste)

“All the injustices have been rendered into law.” (Lanjuin)

ANT.: Justice. Equity. (See these words).


INNÉITÉ

INNOCENCE

INNOVATION

INNOVATION

INOPERANT (ANTE)

INQUISITION

INSATIABLE

INSENSIBILITE

INSIGNE

INSINUATION

INSOCIABILITE

INSOUMIS, INSOUMISSION

INSPIRATION

INSTABILITE

INSTAURATION

INSTIGATION

INSTINCT

INSTITUTION

INSTRUCTION

INSTRUCTION POPULAIRE

INSURRECTION

INTANGIBLE

INTELLECT

INTELLECTUEL

INTELLIGENCE

INTEMPERANCE

1° Point de vue matériel.

2° Point de vue intellectuel.

INTENSITE

INTERDICTION

INTERET

INTERET

INTERET GENERAL

INTERMEDIAIRE

INTERNAT

INTERNAT

INTERNATIONAL

INTERNATIONALE SYNDICALE

INTERNATIONALISME

INTERNEMENT

INTERPELLATION

INTERPOLATION

INTERPRETATION

INTERRUPTION

INTERVENTION

INTERVIEW

INTIMIDATION

INTOLÉRANCE

INTRANSIGEANCE

INTRIGUE

INTRINSEQUE

INTUITION

INTUITION

INTUITION

INVASION

INVENTAIRE

INVENTION

INVENTION

INVERSION SEXUELLE (Homosexualité, Uranisme)

INVESTITURE

INVINCIBLE

INVIOLABILITE

IRONIE

IRREDUCTIBLE

IRREGULIER

IRREGULIER (l’) (et l’Anarchiste)

IRRESOLUTION

IRRESPONSABILITE

ISRAELITE

ISRAELITE

IVRESSE

 

About Shawn P. Wilbur 2057 Articles
Independent scholar, translator and archivist.