Anarchism defined (“Twentieth Century,” 1890)

Anarchism does not mean no government. It means no government by physical force. It does not mean each for himself independently of all. It means voluntary cooperation. Anarchism is Socialism without physical compulsion. It does not mean the destruction of our present forms of government by physical violence. It means the harmonizing of society by education in sociologic science. It does not contemplate sudden changes. It recognizes that slowness is a necessary characteristic of evolution. Anarchism is the synonym for sociologic evolution. It means that we should proceed in the direction of less government by physical force until we learn how to dispense with all. It does not advocate license for the criminal. It demands liberty for the worthy. It would restrain burglars, murderers, land grabbers, money monopolists, tax gatherers — those who injure or despoil others by physical force operating without or by means of statute law. But it would give freedom of opportunity to the wealth producer. Anarchists know they will not have the state of society they want until it can be secured by public opinion.


[Hugh O. Pentecost?], “Editorial,” Twentieth Century 4 no. 19 (May 8, 1890): 2.

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Independent scholar, translator and archivist.