Contr’un Revisited

While we’re looking at arguments for synthesis among different theories of anarchism, it’s worth noting the difficulties of keeping any developing body of thought coherent. This is true even of the work of single theorists, as I am afraid I know only too well. The problem is essentially the same when we’re looking at individual explorations of anarchy and anarchism as it is when we are talking about shared or parallel exploration in the larger milieu. The questions are big enough and present enough novel problems that it is almost inevitable that we’ll find ourselves pursuing multiple questions, leading us in multiple directions, with no very convenient opportunities to stop and see to what extent the various explorations really converge.

With several works of anarchist history and theory now lined up and at least tentatively outlined, it seems that, convenient or not, it’s time to at least skim back through the content of the various blogs being combined here. Over the last couple of days, I have finished importing the posts from the Contr’un and Proudhon Library blogs and have started the process of rereading and annotating the combined feeds. In order to simplify my own writing process, and to hopefully smooth the path for those who have been wrestling with my admittedly labyrinthine output, my plan is to reorganize a bit, archiving posts offline when they are no longer valid or useful, moving some purely historical posts and translations out of the Contr’un collection, while moving some theoretical writings from other blogs into that collection. My hope is to make the reorganized Contr’un a useful representation of my developing thought about anarchist history and theory, complete, where appropriate, with marginal commentary. But that’s still going to be a fairly daunting amount of prose, so I will also be creating a sort of “best of” collection:

  • Contr’un Revisited: a collection here on the Libertarian Labyrinth site, collecting the posts that will serve as a foundation for the new works. Those works will be posted to various social media sites for reading and possible discussion.

Those sites are:

Anyone interested in my particular take on “neo-Proudhonian” anarchism—and the contributions it might make to the project of a more shareable conception of anarchism in general—is encouraged to subscribe to the appropriate forums or follow the appropriate feeds. I will certainly welcome any feedback and discussion of the material.

About Shawn P. Wilbur 2060 Articles
Independent scholar, translator and archivist.